Preparing for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

 
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About

This University of Toronto initiative brings together academic researchers and partner organizations to assess how training, education, and public policies should respond to the changing nature of work in an era marked by disruptive technologies. Read more

 

Features

We are linking with partners from educational institutions, government bodies, and private industry to assemble relevant data on the changing world of work in Canada. Here is some highlights from our latest research:

01.

Policy Options for the Changing World of Work

This research paper offers a critical assessment of contemporary ideas about labour market training, as well as of the initiatives proposed to assist workers and industries unsettled by technological disruption. 

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02.

Database of Recent Research on the Future of Work

This extensive literature repository has allowed our team to assess trends in experts' analysis of and predictions on the changing world of work. 

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03.

Database of Jurisdictional Responses to the Future of Work

This database surveys government, for-profit, and not-for-profit programs designed to support workers displaced by new technologies, and programs designed to help individuals develop the skills necessary to thrive in future modes of work. 

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04.

Directory of Data Sources

This data scan provides an exhaustive inventory of surveys, administrative data, and microdata focusing on education or training and labour market outcomes such as wages, employment, etc. 

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Articles of Interest

Current upheavals in the labour market -- and anxieties about the future of work -- are gaining ever-increasing media attention.

General Motors in Oshawa, Ontario. CARLOS OSORIO / REUTERS

General Motors in Oshawa, Ontario. CARLOS OSORIO / REUTERS

Countries must protect workers from technological disruptions. Here’s how.

From Washington Post: “Both Canada and the United States are laggards when it comes to public investment in adult job seekers … But providing people the right skills isn’t just a question of more funding. Many publicly funded job retraining initiatives are ineffective and were designed in a different, less tumultuous time.”

“Our problem today is just finding people who want to work.” LAUREN JUSTICE / NEW YORK TIMES

“Our problem today is just finding people who want to work.” LAUREN JUSTICE / NEW YORK TIMES

As Hiring Slows, Employers Say It’s Getting Harder to Find Workers

From NY Times: "The reason is simple: Workers are not being rewarded for their efforts.”

The Eaton Centre. ANDREW FRANCIS WALLACE / TORONTO STAR FILE PHOTO

The Eaton Centre. ANDREW FRANCIS WALLACE / TORONTO STAR FILE PHOTO

‘Soft’ skills key for young people looking for work, says study

From The Star: "While dealing with customers at a shop or bank (or patients in a hospital) are obvious situations where communication is vital, it’s also crucial in Canada’s burgeoning tech sector. The stereotype of a socially awkward IT professional stuck in a back office somewhere no longer holds true — if it ever did.”

 

HOW TO GET INVOLVED

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